May 13, 2018

Why the surge of women candidates may not change the Capitol

An EMILY's list event at the 2016 Democratic National Convention. Photo: Paul Zimmerman/Getty Images For EMILY's List

The N.Y. Times' Kate Zernike and Denise Lu explain why this year's 476 female House candidates have a tough road ahead.

The issue: "More than half the female candidates for House and Senate seats are challenging incumbents, who historically almost always win; there were far more wide-open races in 1992’s so-called Year of the Woman, which doubled the number of women in Congress."

  • "A large percentage of the women now running for open seats are in districts that favor the other party."
  • "And many female candidates are clustered in the same districts, meaning many will be eliminated in this spring and summer’s primaries."
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Supreme Court to hear Philadelphia case over same-sex foster parents

Photo: Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

The Supreme Court agreed Monday to hear a high-profile case that could reshape the bounds of First Amendment protections for religion.

Why it matters: The direct question in this case is whether Philadelphia had the right to cancel a contract with an adoption agency that refused to place foster children with same-sex couples. It also poses bigger questions that could lead the court to overturn a key precedent and carve out new protections for religious organizations.

Why Apple may move to open iOS

Photo illustration: Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Apple may finally allow iPhone owners to set email or browsing apps other than Apple's own as their preferred defaults, according to a Bloomberg report from last week.

The big picture: Customers have long clamored for the ability to choose their preferred apps, and now Apple, like other big tech companies, finds itself under increased scrutiny over anything perceived as anticompetitive.