New York's Capitol Building in Albany. Photo: Joe Sohm/Visions of America/UIG via Getty Images

The Democratic National Committee and the Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee are teaming up in the battle for state legislature seats across the country — with the DNC set to invest an additional $500,000 in 11 state parties.

Why it matters: Democrats lost around 1,000 state legislative seats under Barack Obama. Control of state chambers grants control over map redistricting, which is currently favorable to Republicans. And this last-minute investment adds to the collective $35 million both groups have already put into the 2018 cycle.

The big picture: A lot of the midterms focus has been on House and Senate races, but the two groups believe "the first line of resistance against Republicans’ extremist policies starts in the states," according to a joint memo.

By the numbers: There are more than 6,000 state legislative seats up for election this cycle.

  • Per the memo, Democrats are 17 seats away from flipping eight state chambers in New York, Colorado, Maine, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Arizona, New Hampshire and Florida.
  • The DNC has also invested $20 million in state parties across the country to elect Democrats at all levels.
  • The DNC and DLCC’s efforts have helped Democrats flip more than 40 state legislative seats so far.

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Why it matters: As millions of students are about to start the school year virtually, at least in part, experts fear students may fall off an educational cliff — missing key academic milestones, falling behind grade level and in some cases dropping out of the educational system altogether.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 21,280,608 — Total deaths: 767,422— Total recoveries: 13,290,879Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 5,335,398 — Total deaths: 168,903 — Total recoveries: 1,796,326 — Total tests: 65,676,624Map.
  3. Health: The coronavirus-connected heart ailment that could lead to sudden death in athletes — Patients grow more open with their health data during pandemic.
  4. States: New York to reopen gyms, bowling alleys, museums.
  5. Podcasts: The rise of learning podsSpecial ed under pressure — Not enough laptops — The loss of learning.