Demonstrators in Texas protest President Trump's "zero-tolerance" policy. Photo: Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images

18 state attorneys general filed a joint lawsuit Tuesday challenging the constitutionality of the Trump administration's family separation policy and calling for the reunification of the migrant families who were affected.

The details: The multi-state suit was filed by Washington, California, Maryland, Oregon, New Mexico, New Jersey, Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota, Rhode Island, New York, Vermont, North Carolina, and Delaware; the Commonwealths of Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Virginia; and the District of Columbia (collectively, the states).

The backdrop: Trump signed an executive order last week aimed at ending the practice that prosecutes adults crossing the border illegally.

  • Yes, but: There are a still a lot of unanswered questions, despite the order — like what will happen to families that have already been separated.

What the suit says: It accuses the administration of denying migrants — many of whom are fleeing violence in Central America — due process and their right to seek asylum. The states also argue that Trump’s order is riddled with caveats, which create uncertainty in respect to its effectiveness.

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Uber to buy Postmates in $2.65 billion deal

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Uber has agreed to acquire food delivery company Postmates for $2.65 billion in an all-stock deal, the companies announced Monday.

Why it matters: This is the latest merger for the food delivery space as the sector undergoes an ongoing market consolidation.

Analysts expect soaring stock market despite slashed earnings forecasts

Data: FactSet; Chart: Axios Visuals

Despite cutting expectations for companies' earnings by the most in history and revenue by the most since 2009, Wall Street analysts are getting increasingly bullish on the overall direction of the U.S. stock market.

What's happening: Equity analysts are expecting earnings in the second quarter to fall by 43.8% — the most since 2008's fourth quarter 69.1% decline.

Case growth outpacing testing in coronavirus hotspots

Data: The COVID Tracking Project. Note: Vermont and Hawaii were not included because they have fewer than 20 cases per day. Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The United States' alarming rise in coronavirus cases isn't due to increased testing — particularly not where cases have grown fastest over the last month.

Why it matters: The U.S. doesn't yet know what it looks like when a pandemic rages on relatively unchecked after the health system has become overwhelmed. It may be about to find out.