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A wildfire burns in Napa, California. Photo: Rich Pedroncelli / AP

The California wildfires have so far scorched over 170,000 acres of land and forced evacuations of more than 25,000 as of Tuesday night. A California fire official said 3,500 homes and businesses have been destroyed, the AP reports.

The big picture: This is "one of the worst disasters in California history," as California Highway Patrol Capt. Mike Palacio called it.

  • Of the two largest fires, Tubbs is not contained and Atlas is just 3% contained, per the LA Times. For up -to-date information, check Cal Fire on fire conditions.
  • At least 17 people have been killed, 11 of which were in Sonoma County, per CNN.
  • More than 100 are being treated in Napa-area and Sonoma-area hospitals, per CNN.
  • 300 are reported missing and 110 are reported safe, the LA Times reports, although about 80 cell towers have been destroyed or damaged, making contact between friends and family members difficult, per The Washington Post.
  • Local officials ordered fresh evacuations in Sonoma County, and officials said Tuesday it might take weeks before residents are able to return, per The Washington Post.
  • Local curfews are still in place for Santa Rosa.
  • Residents near the fires are encouraged to pack bags ready to go with personal documents in medicine in case they need to flee, per CNN.
  • More than a dozen schools are closed in 7 counties, per The Washington Post.
  • Resources from both California and Nevada are being deployed to fight the blazes, per The Washington Post.
  • Red flag conditions, with wind gusts of up to 40mph, are expected to remain and even pick up until Thursday in the North Bay Area, per the National Weather Service. No rain is forecast this week.
  • More than 8 million acres have been incinerated in California this year with some 7,500 fires blazing.
  • Santa Rosa is advising donations be sent to the Salvation Army or unitedwinecountry.org.
  • Trump has approved California Gov. Jerry Brown's request for federal assistance.

One scenario to consider, from The Washington Post: "One couple had to jump into their pool as flames rushed across their land, taking occasional gasps for air as flames lapped at their backs."

A look forward on economic impacts: The cost of lost crops could near $100 million as part of California's $58 billion wine industry, per Bloomberg.

Go deeper: Where northern California's wildfires are raging with Axios' Lazaro Gamio

Go deeper

Biden will reverse Trump's attempt to lift COVID related travel restrictions

Photo: Tasos Katopodis via Getty

The incoming Biden administration will reverse President Trump's last-minute order to lift COVID-19 related travel restrictions, Jen Psaki, the incoming White House press secretary, tweeted.

Why it matters: President Trump ordered entry bans lifted for travelers from the U.K., Ireland, Brazil and much of Europe to go into effect Jan. 26, but the Biden administration will "strengthen public health measures around international travel in order to further mitigate the spread of COVID-19," Jen Psaki said. Biden will be inaugurated on Wednesday, Jan. 20 and Trump will no longer be president by the time the order is set to go into effect.

Dominion sends cease and desist letter to My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell

Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Dominion Voting Systems on Monday sent a cease and desist letter to My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell over his spread of misinformation related to the 2020 election.

Why it matters: Trump and several of his allies have pushed false conspiracy theories about the company, leading Dominion to take legal action. It's suing pro-Trump lawyer Sidney Powell for defamation and $1.3 billion in damages, and a Dominion employee has sued Trump himself, OANN and Newsmax.

Off the Rails

Episode 5: The secret CIA plan

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer, Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. This Axios series takes you inside the collapse of a president.

Episode 5: Trump vs. Gina — The president becomes increasingly rash and devises a plan to tamper with the nation's intelligence command.

In his final weeks in office, after losing the election to Joe Biden, President Donald Trump embarked on a vengeful exit strategy that included a hasty and ill-thought-out plan to jam up CIA Director Gina Haspel by firing her top deputy and replacing him with a protege of Republican Congressman Devin Nunes.