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A Capitol Police officer wears a mourning band today. Photo by Al Drago/Getty Images

Lawmakers are working through post-siege emotions recalling the stages of grief, one member of Congress tells Axios.

Driving the news: More details and video of the horrific event emerged over the weekend.

  • Stress: Some House members heard the gunshot that killed a protester trying to break into the Speaker's Lobby, normally their sanctuary.
  • The post-game: Video, first-hand stories in newspapers and chats with colleagues have all heightened their understanding of the magnitude of the assault on their workplace.
  • Coronavirus: The Capitol physician told members today they may have been exposed to someone with a COVID-19 infection when they clustered together in hiding last week.
  • Travel: Sens. Mitt Romney and Lindsey Graham were hounded as they made their way to and from Washington last week.
  • Safety in D.C.: The House is expected to reconvene this week in a newly fortified Capitol amid internet chatter of another protest on Jan. 17, or linked to the inauguration on Jan. 20.
  • Impeachment: A weighty topic has been foist upon the House and Senate — for the second time in two years.
  • No end in sight: Rep. James Clyburn (D-S.C.) told CNN's Jake Tapper on "State of the Union" that the House may pass an impeachment resolution — but then not forward it to the Senate until after Biden's first 100 days.
Subscribe to Axios AM/PM for a daily rundown of what's new and why it matters, directly from Mike Allen.
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Go deeper

In photos: Protests outside fortified capitols draw only small groups

Armed members of the far-right extremist group the Boogaloo Bois near the Michigan Capitol Building in Lansing on Jan. 17. About 20 protesters showed up, AP notes. Photo: Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images

Small groups of protesters gathered outside fortified statehouses across the U.S. over the weekend ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

The big picture: Some protests attracted armed members of far-right extremist groups but there were no reports of clashes, as had been feared. The National Guard and law enforcement outnumbered demonstrators, as security was heightened around the U.S. to avoid a repeat of the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riots, per AP.

Jan 17, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Republicans ignore McCarthy and name-drop anyway

Rep. Liz Cheney speaks as House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy watches. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc via Getty Images

Members of the House Republican Conference ignored leader Kevin McCarthy last week when he warned them against criticizing colleagues by name based on intelligence that doing so could trigger more political violence.

Why it matters: McCarthy made clear that name-dropping opponents, instead of spelling out complaints in more general terms, can put a literal target on a politician, especially with tensions so high following the events of Jan. 6.

In photos: D.C. and U.S. states on alert for pre-inauguration violence

National Guard troops stand behind security fencing with the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building behind them, on Jan. 16. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Security has been stepped up in Washington, D.C., and state capitols across the U.S. as authorities brace for potential violence this weekend.

Driving the news: Following the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol by some supporters of President Trump, the FBI has said there could be armed protests in D.C. and in all 50 state capitols in the run-up to President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.